Setting the Record Straight about Type 2 Diabetes

Posted 11/15/2018 in Diabetes

Millions of Americans live with or are at risk for type 2 diabetes. In honor of American Diabetes Month in November, Regional Medical Center (RMC) along with the American Diabetes Association is working to answer common questions about type 2 diabetes.

Q: If you’re overweight, will you always develop type 2 diabetes?

A: While being overweight is a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes, other risk factors - such as how much physical activity you get, quality of food intakes, family history, ethnicity, and age - also play a role. Many people with type 2 diabetes are at a normal weight or only moderately overweight.

Q: Is diabetes caused by eating sugar?

A: Type 2 diabetes is not caused by sugar, but by genetics and lifestyle factors. A diet high in calories from any source (including sugar) contributes to weight gain, which increases your risk for type 2 diabetes.

Q: Do sugary drinks cause diabetes?

A: Research has shown that drinking sugary drinks is linked to type 2 diabetes. This includes soda, fruit punch, fruit drinks, energy drinks, sports drinks, and more.

Q: How serious is type 2 diabetes?

A: Type 2 diabetes causes more deaths per year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. Having type 2 diabetes nearly doubles your chances of having a heart attack.

Q: What can I do to decrease my risk for type 2 diabetes?

A: A healthy lifestyle can drastically reduce your chances for developing type 2 diabetes. For assistance on meal planning and activity tips, please give the nurse educators and/or dietitians a call for a free consultation at 563-927-7763.

Q: What do I do if I’m pre-diabetic or have already been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes?

A: There are many options to manage your current stage of diabetes. RMC has programs to help your individual needs. Talk to your primary care provider at Regional Family Health to schedule an appointment with a member of our Diabetes Management team.

To learn more about American Diabetes Month, visit diabetes.org/everydayreality.