3D Mammography

Digital Mammography

3D Mammography is an X-ray of the breast tissue which is captured on specially designed digital detectors using low-dose radiation.

What is Digital Mammography?
Digital Mammography is an X-ray of the breast tissue which is captured on specially designed digital detectors using low-dose radiation. The key role of mammography is to detect and identify breast cancer in its early stage when it is very small and therefore more treatable. Studies have shown that when detected early, the chance for successful treatment of breast cancer is nearly 100%.

How to Prepare for the Study:
Dress in a comfortable two-piece outfit since you will undress from above the waist. Do not use any deodorants, powders, or ointments around the breast and underarm area, as this can affect the quality of the image. You should not schedule your mammogram just before or during your menstrual period, especially if you have breast pain during this time. The week after your period is when breast tissue will be less tender. Please inform the technologist if you have implants, as additional imaging is required.

During the Exam:
A screening mammogram usually consists of two views of each breast, though additional imaging may be required depending upon breast size. The breast tissue is compressed during the exam which helps to decrease the exposure and increase tissue detail.

A diagnostic mammogram involves additional views of the breast and is used when an abnormality is found during a screening exam or in a patient who has breast complaints, such as breast mass or lump, nipple discharge, breast pain, or skin thickening.

A specially trained radiologist will review the images and make a comparison to previous mammography studies. A report will be sent to your healthcare provider and you will receive a patient result letter in the mail.

Who should have a mammogram?
The American Cancer Society recommends that at age 40 women should begin yearly mammograms. If you have a strong family history of breast cancer or other risk factors, your healthcare provider may recommend beginning earlier screening. For more information on breast cancer, visit the National Breast Cancer Foundation.